Statistics about teen dating

Welcome to Do Something.org, a global movement of 5.5 million young people making positive change, online and off! The 11 facts you want are below, and the sources for the facts are at the very bottom of the page. Teens ages 15 to 17 are around twice as likely as those ages 13 to 14 to have ever had some type of romantic relationship experience (44% vs. These older teens also are significantly more likely to say they are currently in an active relationship, serious or otherwise (18% vs. Older teens also are more likely to be sexually active, as 36% of 15- to 17-year-olds with romantic relationship experience have had sex, compared with 12% of 13- to 14-year-olds with relationship experience.Besides age, there are relatively few demographic differences when it comes to teens’ experiences with dating and romantic relationships.The survey asked about three different categories of romantic relationships and found: Some 64% of teens indicate that they have never been in a romantic relationship of any kind (and 1% declined to provide their relationship status).The 35% of teens who say they are either currently involved with a romantic partner or have ever dated, hooked up with or had a romantic relationship with someone will serve as the focus of the remainder of this report.When we refer to “teen daters,” “teens with relationship experience” or “teens with dating experience” we are referring to this roughly one-third of teenagers who are currently in some type of relationship or have been at some point in the past.

Age is the primary demographic dividing line when it comes to dating and romance.

Teen Dating Violence (TDV), also known as Adolescent Relationship Abuse (ARA), can be defined as violence and/or abuse among two adolescents, ages 10-24 in a current, past and/or potential romantic relationship, including physical, verbal, emotional, sexual, economic, technological, and stalking, where there is an imbalance of power and a pattern of coercion over time.

More than half of the victims of violence and abuse had their first experience in adolscence, which further increases negative health outcomes across the lifespan.

For high school males, more than 7% reported physical violence and about 5% reported sexual violence from a dating partner. Healthy relationship behaviors can have a positive effect on a teen’s emotional development.

A CDC Report found among victims of contact sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, nearly 23% of females and 14% of males first experienced some form of violence by that partner before age 18. Unhealthy, abusive, or violent relationships can have short- and long-term negative effects on a developing teen.

Dating and experience with romance are relatively common – but far from universal – among teens ages 13 to 17.

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